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20131101
20131130
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 903 (some duplicates have been removed)
a small fire into a really big fire without much help. inhalation hazards, don't breathe it. okay. the rest it self explanatory. there is nfpa 704 diamonds, you don't need to know that blue, health. :number 4 it will wreck your health fast. 0 means no problem. red, same. 4 means it's a fire hazard and poof, catch on fire like that. this is it may detonate. this is the dns hacienda. there is a health hazard but we are clueing into number 4. there is flammable stuff in there when frank and i show up we put on our thinking caps. >> do you think putting this great label on the front door is a good idea? glass front door? may be not. what happens when you leave you leave the door open or when we show up, we break the door down. somewhere to the side is better. hazardous material and how they get into us. you breathe them. you can eat them or get them on you. okay. or they can be injected into you. like if you have hazardous material at the grand autoand you slip and you get stuck. it's in you and on you. stay out of that place. here's a look of hazardous spills. the can tainer is bubl
an earthquake. don't kick it, pick it up or taste it. you will safety first. then everybody around you. isolate the area, for everybody else. and notice the fire department, that's us. around the house we use, limit the amount of stuff you are storing. we like to isolate the materials in enclosed cabinets locked metal ones are best, separate the flammables for the oxidizers. the bleach from the ammonia. you will ask me, george, where do i take this garage full of stuff. i have a garage full of stuff i don't use. there is a place on tunnel avenue if you are a city resident you take it down there and show them you are a city resident and they will take it. call us. say, i can't get down there i have, they might come out with 50 gallon drums if you have waste or oil they will come and pick it up. if you have gasoline you haven't used in a while they will come and pick it up. the main thing is safety. we don't want to end up like this guy. he didn't heed the warnings. for each one of these to carry out this guy, how many guys are backing them up? i figure 4 a piece. we don't send in a team unless w
after, that's when people form and that's when they help out. >> this is the home work. you don't have to write it down it's in the manual. simple things for your home. hazardous conditions in our house. there is a course evaluation in the back of the book. i'm rob [laughter]. >> okay. let's get into the program today is utility control and fire hazard material. we will teaching how to turn your utility's off and what hazardous materials to look for. >> the first thing is natural gas. what do you know about natural gas? flammable. it goes, boom. it's important to shut this off. we use it for cooking, eating and hot water. there were 40,000 people that called pg and e about their gas. that means they call turned off their gas? did they need to do that? when do you have to? when there is a problem. how long did you think it takes pg and e to get out and turn it back on? 45,000 people. days weeks, may be a month. who has seen this in the streets. a lot of muck is in there is it's full of dirt and weeds you turn it to the right to tighten it and left to loosen it. your home work you have
pipes broken and you can have a gas leak. if you smell gas, leave the /tkaors open, don't operate electric switches that will cause a spark. don't use your cell phone. use the cell phone outside or a neighbor's phone to call 911. get everyone out of the building, close the gas valve and forget it. don't open it up again. there is probably a leak and you will have troubles wait for pg and e to test it. what's the most important thing in an emergency? everyday, water. somewhere in front of the house you will see these. san francisco water department. how do you get in here? easy. a long screwdriver or pry bar. pull it this way and the whole thing will lift out. even if it's crusty you can get it out. that's what it looks like. that's brass covered water meter. there it is. how would you tell if water was leaking if the building without going in there? that thing woulding pegged. this guy would be spinning. here's how you shut it on and off. like the gas thing, the valve thing with the square head. there are a couple of ears. you lineup the 2 ears. there is a hole to put a padlock.
out open the deck it was pretty observe we don't go out on that does the children are having fun and the roommates never bothered them and with this larger deck i proposed that i would be more than willing to put a facade up like bamboo or something green something egging could friendly but we'd rather not decrease the size of the deck limited within 12 feet is legal. but i understand the issue that she has i would say we're not - we are just a bunch of good goose we're not wanting to threaten any the children or the businesses. i would like to know respectfully request from the board you allow the completion of that deck we've been working hard. august 29th was stressful within the safety hazards and i'll stop do you know what the grade difference it's on the hill from ms. lewis house roughly >> it would be about 2 feet the grade differences. what do you think you guys >> about 2 feet. >> i have a question too. your sort of community oriented and obviously wanted to maintain don't relations with your neighbor you talked about bamboo. i lived up next to my neighborhood it is n
public health and our environment don't think that so come in down and see how >> started in 1990. the citizens of the marina district came to the fire department and asked for a program to survive for 3 days. there is a 70 percent chance we will have a 6.5 earthquake. 71 large fires. 40 major rescue operations. [inaudible]. rescue operations there were 34 structure fires we need 275 engines to handle this. we have 41. you will be on your own and we should be prepared. we will go over the merge training program. part of the training program is helping you make the decisions that will save lives. in this situation this person carrying a pail of water to put out the fire will not put out the fire. how many people have used a fire extinguisher before. >> may be 10 percent of you. by the end of the week you will be putting out a fire with a fire extinguisher. you don't want to learn out to house an extinguisher when they big fire is in front of you. when you turn off your natural gas and water. hazardous materials will be talked about next week. 35-40 percent of you. you will find o
of the week you will be putting out a fire with a fire extinguisher. you don't want to learn out to house an extinguisher when they big fire is in front of you. when you turn off your natural gas and water. hazardous materials will be talked about next week. 35-40 percent of you. you will find out that all of you have hazardous material in your home. the third week is disaster medicine. you, going into a room spending 45 seconds on one person into 3 life saving techniques. by the fourth we we will teach you as search and rescuers how to keep yourself safe by identifying safe and none safe building to go into. sometimes objects are too heavy for you to liftoff of a body. we will teach you privying which will use anything you have, wood or cement blocks so you is see that people can lift heavy objects off of people. now, you have to have a plan. every program needs to have a plan. we can't say, here are your skills. class 6, after half an hour we will split you into teams of 10 people each. putting out the fires. you will go into a dark room and doing a search. you will be treating people
neighborhood just like the 52-odd other areas. i don't think we need to accommodate them with a parking area, i don't think we need to lose neighborhood parking. these guys don't belong here, they are too big, they are dangerous. the reason they are being blocked in all parts of the city is because they don't block, they are too big. they are bad neighbors, they don't belong, we don't need to make accommodations for them, i'd say option 3, ban the busses, no accommodations (applause) thank you. >> next speaker, please. >> christine that odonnel, owen odonnell >> my name is owen odonnell and i'm going to speak for my wife, christine that. i've lived in al low square for 40 years. i really glae with virtually everything you've heard from the neighbors. one sunday morning about 10:00 my wife stood on the front porch and counted the busses. there were 11 in 10 minutes. factor that into trying to live in a residential neighborhood on a sunday morning. if you approve option 2 i suggest that you cancel the 21 hayes bus line. it won't work any longer. and your on-time performance will plummet becaus
, but we don't know what happens tomorrow. and this system, i don't know of any other system where people who are not employees are monitored to this degree in any other system in the world. and it's frightening, actually. that's all i have to say. >> thank you, sir. >> jim santos, steven humphries. >> good afternoon, mr. santos. >> thanks, good afternoon, my name is jim santos and i work for a company called taxi magic. we provide the nation's largest e-hailing system for booking a taxi via smart phone. i just wanted to touch on the e-hailing factor here. what i wanted to speak mostly about is the cost factor and the complexity of doing what the proposal has. i think that the cost is grossly underestimated in terms of the effort needed to build such a system. i wanted to touch on a few facts. no city has ever created a system remotely similar to this mainly because the private market is already offering data for free and e-hailing systems from companies like ours for free. the vendor you have chosen has never built a system like the one you have in this proposal so they have zero experie
but it kills germs. >> what kind of food do you want to keep? open the fridge don't open it too much. eat all perishable food first. you want to save emergency supplies. what emergency supply food do you want to /kaoepl. keep? energy bars. dry food. canned vegetables. can corn, can peas, you can drain that and drink the water and eat the vegetables. buy can food that you eat normally. and a can opener. first aid kit, have 3. have you a small one in the car, have a nice sized one for home and make sure you have one at work. make sure if you are a diabetic or have a heart condition, something that you normal take have a little supply. have a storage area for this. consider this. if you have a supply kit, make sure you have one that's mobile. mobile meaning, if you have to evacuate a square mile for disaster or terrorist or anything, have it in there with you in case you are on your own for a bit. you might not be in your home. you might be somewhere else. there's a tsunami coming in. if you have kids at home what do you keep for them? make sure you keep them entertained and have food they like.
. and then, i don't know if anyone has any feelings about after midnight or... >> so 6:00 to 1:00 are the hours. >> yeah. and i think that they said 6:00 to 11 are the hours and, then they want to continue playing some music 11 to 1. >> and which is essentially 6 to 1. >> yeah. >> true. >> and i am thinking that as the people go through and to the crowd starts to disperse, i think that what they are trying to do is giving those people who have been waiting in line for hours, you know, something to sort of, and i think that like if this is in a more residential area, i would be a little more concerned, but it is right there on market street. and as long as... and there will be there, people there controlling the sound. i feel like they have done a lot of connecting to people, so that if there is a issue, with the sound then they will be responsive to it. and so, i think that it should be okay. but i would understand if people wanted to restrict the time also. >> i threw it out there, we don't have to keep going with it. >> i think that it is okay, they have communication with th
, this sort of cottage food operation. and obviously it's not a full blown business. i don't know, the dollar threshold you're allowed to make each year i believe they start at 35,000 and escalate to 50. so, we're not looking -- it's not the kind of operation -- it's not a full-on sort of -- an operation that's going to have a big impact in a neighborhood, for example, and that's really important because the whole reason that we restrict home base businesses in certain ways is to preserve the residential character of our residential neighborhoods. >> right. was there any negative -- >> i believe this will be discussed particularly at the planning commission, but i believe that there was one neighborhood organization that weighed in with planning raising concerns about that exact point. that's why we wanted to narrowly tailor this to neighborhood before we broaden it to staff. >> commissioner white. >> i guess i'm curious on the process here. so, in order to be allowed to conduct such a business, you have to get a registration from -- >> tax and treasurer's office. >> tax and treasurer's offic
people in painting, buy the best material you can because you don't want to keep redog it. is this the same concept. >> it is the prep work is important if you go over a bad part tell effect the roof. >> going over a bad surface. the implication is most buildings in san francisco are existing buildings. we don't have that many new buildings that you can put a brand-new work o. most of the work we see and you guys do are reroofs. which is trying to going out what the problem is and how to fix it? is that what you do? >> yes. i was thinking the subsurface. when we see oftentimes someone put a beautiful tile roof on that can last 50 or 70 years the waterproofing under is not up to snuff it the last 15 years you have a 75 year old roof that will last for 15 because the underlayment is not up to the quality of roof itself. that's an example we are seeing here. >> what is the primary cause of failure? failure means that the roof leaks? we can agree the roof doesn't work it leaks. >> it's supposed to rain tomorrow. >> the most important thing is application. >> the failure
the police go up and they believe it. you don't get a lot of interest from city hall on that. you get the business community and convince them the importance of dealing with graffiti and make that important to city hall, you'll be amazed. that was one of my most successful times, when the business community was appreciate you you aring city hall. that's our tax base. at a time when tax bases are diminishing income to citizens is diminishing, when you can show them how different it can be, that suddenly makes good business sense to them and they'll dedicate the resources to you. so, that's what's worked for me. (applause) >> anybody else up there? everybody okay with that answer? i think we're pretty grateful here in san francisco that we have a mayor that was actually the director of the department of public works. so, we know he's totally on top of it and involved. do you have another question? >> this isn't geared towards any particular speaker, but it is geared towards abatement. we have an annual volunteer event where graffiti is removed city-wide. in an effort to encourage youth
missed those moments and that they don't, that they felt they didn't have the training to catch those moments or really do that inner reflection, but then they started sharing their stories of being bullied in their life and why they got into education and suddenly everyone was crying. it's a really amazing moment. so i think those moments are really important. the other thing you asked about with the parent when sunset is referring to alex's dad. >> they are referring to his mom and dad being upset with him for not standing up for himself, i just wanted to cringe. >> what's clear is when dad said if you don't make a stop, this could happen to your little sister. then the sister gets in on it and it's, like, just puts the, as sisters will do, but i think as a, as someone who was a boy and had difficult conversations with my dad, i really really remember that sort of punch them, make it go away. a lot of families will give that advice. i'm not even convinced that's the wrong advice, the problem is when they doesn't work, then they shut down and quit coming to you because they
dad said if you don't make a stop, this could happen to your little sister. then the sister gets in on it and it's, like, just puts the, as sisters will do, but i think as a, as someone who was a boy and had difficult conversations with my dad, i really really remember that sort of punch them, make it go away. a lot of families will give that advice. i'm not even convinced that's the wrong advice, the problem is when they doesn't work, then they shut down and quit coming to you because they are afraid it's a double disappointment. they can't please their peers and find friendship and then they so don't want to lose their fathers as well, this boy-father thing is so deep. >> every single person in this room wants to start making a difference. we want to start doing it right now. ros, how do you start giving a child the dignity that was taken away? >> i'm actually going to use an example that might seem a little far-flung for that question. one of the things i wanted to talk about with colleagues is the write up process when they cuss you out in the classroom or the hallway.
, and if you have an incident number that would be nice. who is the safety person? we don't want to send people out, just hey, go do this. we want to keep track of it. if they don't come back within a couple hours we have to send somebody to find them or at least checkup on them. if we don't know where they went and who they are, you have chaos. they might be hurt and they're going to stay hurt. we're going to roll on to disaster psychology. what does that mean? when people go through a disaster, their lives are wrecked. i saw this firsthand, i went down to help out with katrina thing in september. it's weird. because you are dealing with people that lost everything and it's kind of hard to imagine that if you haven't done it yourself. basically, you know, she's looking at her curtains here, she probably hand-stitched those things. maybe they have been hanging there the last 5 or 6 years. everything in the house is wrecked, photos, keepsakes, it's a tough thing. and people deal with this kind of stress in different ways. we as disaster workers, we see it all the time. but we have a word we use,
by my mom and then the city signed off saying that everything was okay and i don't know if that complaint, something that was done in the 80s or something that was done, you know, in the 90s. but that is where it is at right now and i am just trying to not ignore anybody, but being diligent to stand up for the property and that is my inheritance. >> okay. i would like to hear from the staff, again. and whether you know, the fact that this building is in probate, and it will be sold, the recommendation for us to act on this at all? >> i don't want to get into too much, but for today, we discovered that the subpoena power or court decision would be to with the property that there was a deed recorded and stating that the owners who is deceased and that somebody else had ownership, and that the superior court decision was that document was... (inaudible) and that deed was reversed. so, i think that it would be best that we would just move forward cleanly, and on the order of abatement rather than being dragged into the details that don't need to be exposed in public with reg
the box and, boom, dump it on there. you don't stir is around. you smoth erred it, baking soda doesn't burn. now, we are down to the home work. read these pages in your book, 26-38. locate the gas, water, electric shut off inside and outside the home. do the course evaluation. crank the gas an eighth of a turn to make sure it works and you know where it's at. very good. thank you. [applause]. there are three things we want you to take away. how to open a air way and when to do it and control bleeding and treat shock and we want to talk about disaster medicine an death by trauma and by that i mean the body is acted upon by outside force and first is instant yainous and occurs in minutes and are we going to do much for this person? not so much. maybe in the predisaster situation and making the place safer but once someone is hit with something heavy and die within minutes you're not going to happen, and the next is occurring within minutes of the injury and bleeding to death or having their air way blocked or some unrecognized medical problem and this is the group we're going to help,
protection. gloves, eye protection, and masks and sanitation and hand washing and who among us don't have a nick or a cut on their hand and are you going to touch someone's blood and your in tac skin will protect you from most ilknows. however, if you have a cut on your hand you have a path for infection to get inside of you and you want a pair of latex gloves -- several pairs of glo gloves that you can put on and change as you go from patient t patient hopefully and at least wash your hands and disinfect your hands between patient contacts and the eyes are like an open wound and path to get into your body and glasses and take the old glasses and throw them in your kit and you have something to wear and face mask and of course dust and dirt and all of these disasters throw up dust and dirt and especially in a dryer season and push comes t shove a band da bandana. and after a disaster is not the time to let your hygiene slip and it's a time to tighten it u and communitycable diseases and if it's wet and not yours don't touch it. gloves and every patient contac and don't touch blood and it'
don't think the water itself hurts the roof. in the areas it ponds that's where the dirt ends up. it tends to wear the cap sheet down faster. what we recommend is every 4 years you may need to go on the areas where it a wearing the cap sheet and put emulsion and reimbed the granules. >> it's really difficult get a pond off an existing roof. when you raise an area you push it to the next. when you raise another area it pushes to another area. it's difficult to do on some of the roofs. if they tried to do this and took the roof off and tried to do it you might want to ask, why is the taper not working the way it was supposed to work? >> it's not reasonable to say, let's take it off and rebuild the roof do routine maintenance. >> i roofer would know how to do it? is >> yes. >> let's finish talking about flashings. how many roofs there are one of the ways you can sometimes tell is by counting how many of the metal stops you have on the edge of the roof like that? the simplest of all ways if you see 2 or 3 you know they are there because there was a roof put on. >> sometimes tha
under advisement, is there a time limit for those? >> 30 days. >> if they don't get the permit issued and inspected and signed out during the 40 day period, we move forward without any further hearing, and issue the order of abatement and assess fees. >> thank you. >> i was going to have rose mary talk on behalf of housing and so i will just mention it for her and she is comment on it if she comes back, the housing performed were 895 and the complaints were 412, and the complaints response within 24 to 78 hours were 763, the notice of violations 168, the mraints for notice of violations were 596 and the number of cases since the director's hearing was 33 for the housing. >> okay. >> that is good, thank you. >> thank you, commissioners. >> great. >> is there any public comment on item 4 athrough 4 e, of the director's report? >> seeing none, item five, discussion and update regarding october 17, 2013 inspections and planning department request to suspend pending permits at 1049 market street. >> the legislative and public affairs, and just a quick update on 1049 market street. right af
dispieed the purpose and that was not the case and willing to provide the inspection and i don't think that the conditions inside of the property have changed much although i do think that they look better on the outside of the property and that is where she has been focusing her efforts because that is where the neighbors are complainting, and we think that the property does not look as nice as ours and when those complaints come in she focuses her efforts on that but she is limited. so i am open to suggestion and open to assisting and you know, i am not being paid for my efforts in this matter, and i am doing this probono because i believe in this cause and i believe that is an issue that should be corrected if we can get a time able that everybody can live with and we can all continue the dialogue towards making sure that that happened. and so, now i am open to whatever suggestions that the panel has and in that regard and willing to participate however i can and assessing the home owner for the continued costs, and it is not going to get us to a place where this building gets fixed
on details like brick foundation. there are things people would see as unique. you should have comfort, i don't know, if it's the registered structural >> it's abag.gov. within the earthquake section, there's information about retrofitting wood structures and a list of engineers. a lot of these are single family. i think there are engineers listed there too. i might be wrong. it's a great resource and the associations staff went through and looked at them. if you are a contractor, you might want to get in there. it's free advertising. >> i have to say, in san francisco, we have so many difficult buildings. these are all one off buildings. it requires an engineer to take a look. >> not just a contractor >> not just prioritize. >> just going straight to a contractor. >> i said that with a caveat. that's for a single-family, cripple wall, >> yes, i am a contractor. i find in the public, there's a lot of confusion. could you talk about the generally standards of retrofitting. i think people need to understand, the generally accepted standards to which you can strengthen a building. >> basically,
in earthquake, they don't happen with structures falling down, they happen with items falling on you like televisions and bookcases. that's most of the deaths that happen in earthquakes. a moderately damaged building, this would be one that has a greater amount of cracking on the interior. moderately damaged building, you can actually go into. the procedures you would follow are basically the same. gather information, shut off utilities when you need to, locate and stabilize injured patients and get them out, so evacuate the injured to a safe area. you want to get them out as soon as you can, get out yourself as soon as you can, and document what you found in that building. these are heavily buildings. these are the two buildings that actually collapsed three days after the earthquake. this building was leaning on this building. procedures for heavily damaged buildings, don't go in. but you still will gather information. shut off utilities if it's safe to do it. you report it. we can cordon off the area just to make sure nobody else goes in the area. definitely tell the fire chief or whoe
's their social life. >> and one of the reasons that a lot of researchers and nonprofits don't like the term "cyber bull" and it's about the technology but not the behavior itself. we don't actually use the world cyber bullying. we talk about the behavior and there is tons of research we're doing in how people are behaving on our platform and the tools we can give them to resolve their issues and either through themselves and trusted audiences, et cetera, or turn to us and we don't use the term "cyber bullying" and we don't think about it's the technology. it's about the behavior itself and i know there is ongoing debate with that and cyber bullying captures people's attentions and everything i have learned from anne and the nonprofit community and the academic folks who have researched this when you use a term like "cyber bullying" you are diminishing the behavior and placing it on the technology. >> personally i hate it. it suggests robots and not humans at all. let's think about humanity, not technology. >> so i want to show you a couple of things and show you my version of a sizzl
grand -- don't beep at me. hey. what's that big tager you have down there? either one. >> [inaudible]. ger you have down there? either one. >> [inaudible]. >> i put you on the spot. * >> i think it's smoker. >> smoker? hold on on that. >> [inaudible]. >> as you can see, once you pull on the graffiti tracker, you have -- this is what the activity is in phoenix right now. i can tell you my top 10 right now, my most active taggers are size, toke, miller, merk, miller, rats, break, i know eight of those right now i have identified. still got to go out and check them. the way we like to do t though, once we identify them, we like to sit down and catch them in the act. it's easier to do in court and make a big case after you catch them in the act. what did you say? you got merc? let's take a look at merc. this is what happens. once you get on graffiti checker, you can find somebody, you can put a search in there for any tagger that you want. i know you had m. ob, money over bitches, that's a big tagging crew. over 700 incidences right now in phoenix. and the cool thing is you find out * t
a book signing. the book came out yesterday. she will have a book signing during lunch. next is don porter, the producer of gideon's army. the clip we just saw. don is a founder of trilogy films and director of gideon's army. it premiered in the 2010 sundance festival. she's an a -- she's on the 2012 hot shot directors emerging to watch, she's also graduated from georgetown university law center and practicing attorney and abc television networks before starting her television career and next is john. i met john about 10 years ago when he was starting off and had this crazy idea of operating a training center for public defenders and he did. he's no now the president and founder and one of the contributors to gideon's army, he's from john marshall law school where he teaches law and criminal procedure. he was in the post katrina and new orleans center. he trained people in the film. he received an advocacy fellowship and named a public interest fellow by harvard law school. next we have maurice call well. he was convicted in the housing project here in san francisco. there was no
for me. i can see there is an honest person in the system. i kind of got mixed up in it and how, i don't know. i'm glad and they actually had people that care about people behind bars. i'm more aware of my freedom taking it for granted. i'm free and loving life. [ applause ] >> i would like to ask our first panel to come up and take their seats. >> i'm going to start on my right to your left here and introduce karen hooper, the author of chasing gideon and i just want to announce that she will be holding a book signing. the book came out yesterday. she will have a book signing during lunch. next is don porter, the producer of gideon's army. the clip we just saw. don is a founder of trilogy films and director of gideon's army. it premiered in the 2010 sundance festival. she's an a -- she's on the 2012 hot shot directors emerging to watch, she's also graduated from georgetown university law center and practicing attorney and abc television networks before starting her television career and next is john. i met john about 10 years ago when he was starting off and had this crazy idea of ope
't know what else to do. i decided the wall -- i don't have any tattoos. i'm going to get the last name of every case i lost. hopefully i won't fill my back up. since this is going on the wall, i feel it has to go on my back. >> when you work as a public defender, you saved somebody and they are like what does that mean? i defend people who are charged with people committing crime. they say how can you defend people? i say it's about the sanctity of human liberty and the cost if you want to take it. >> most important is trying to keep their moral up and try to keep their best interest at heart. i know for me when i relate to my clients i see them as cousins or brothers or uncles just because it's the face of the black community. so many of them are locked up and of course i'm having to work against their initial impression of public defender because their public defender somehow screwed them. >> how are you? >> good. >> sit over here. how are you? >> good. >> it's freezing outside. >> you know why i'm here. i'm trying to get a better understanding of the place where you were arrested.
. we have a program for leaders, a program for trainers. a program for our graduates, all from don's film have come through the program. that's why i did it. i really believe the public defenders can walk through a room across systems and remind people of these ideals that gideon was all about that quite frankly everyone in the system has forgotten. [ applause ] >> so judge. tell us about what is some of the concrete stechs steps that we can take in terms of training lawyers? it's great that you are working with individual lawyers, but how do you create a movement? how do you reach the 15,000 public defenders. you have to also republican there remember there are contract attorneys where there are no public defenders office. >> i want to share one more story with you. a couple weeks ago a friend of mine forwarded a link. one of the public defenders leader who headed up a state system was testifying before a budget committee and the committee asked him, do you have enough resources to do your job? and his response was well, i'm in a district with 5 counties and i have, so there a
hear a second commissioners? i don't hear a second >> i think the department themselves would be well-advised to second this you can't approve a drawing out of the context it's impossible. >> commissioner antonini. >> i have to understand i have a pretty good idea of how this particular property is being expanded and safes there's to variance but the rear generated is okay. and the house steps down in co-op the slope of the property so it seems to me and they talked about the minimum of 5 foot set badgering back on either side is gracious because we require at least a 3 foot set back and the light well, is present i'm not positive about that that maybe part of what commissioner moore is looking for. i like the project and it makes senses and it restores what the building looks like and it looks better in the future from the other which that was stuccoed. i will not take d r i want to hear with the other commissioners have to say >> looked like to know if the project sponsor architect if f is in the office. would you like to come up and talk about the questions raised will i commiss
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 903 (some duplicates have been removed)

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